Felistowe Dockers

Felistowe Dockers

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Extraordinary moment an out of control ferry smashes into a concrete port wall on the holiday island of Gran Canaria, injuring five people

  • Five people have been taken to hospital after a ferry crashed off Gran Canaria 
  • Ferry smashed into port wall in Las Palmas after a power cut 'lasting two minutes'
  • One man suffered a broken collar bone, five more received treatment on scene
  • Up to 200,000 litres of fuel was initially feared to have spilled into the ocean 
Five people have been taken to hospital after a spectacular ferry crash on the holiday island of Gran Canaria.
The ferry crashed into a pier after suffering a technical fault that caused a power cut lasting just two minutes, according to operating company Naviera Armas.  
Video footage showed the ship - which was heading towards the neighbouring island of Tenerife with 140 passengers, 30 crew members and dozens of vehicles on board - adrift and at the mercy of the sea before it hit the concrete wall at the entrance to Luz Port in the Gran Canaria capital Las Palmas.
Ferry smashes into port wall after engine failure in Gran Canaria
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Five people have been taken to hospital after a ferry crashed off Gran Canaria. The car ferry smashed into a port wall in Las Palmas after an engine failure while five more were treated on scene
Five people have been taken to hospital after a ferry crashed off Gran Canaria. The car ferry smashed into a port wall in Las Palmas after an engine failure while five more were treated on scene
Five people were taken to hospital including one man who suffered a broken collarbone after falling to the ground during the collision, and another five received medical attention at the scene.
Most of those affected, who included a pregnant woman, suffered panic attacks. None were seriously injured.
It is thought some British holidaymakers were on board the vessel at the time, although the exact number is not known.
The incident, involving a car ferry called the Volcan de Tamasite which regularly covers the two-and-a-half-long route between the two islands, happened just before 8.30 on Friday.

WHAT WENT WRONG?

An electricity failure stopped power to the engine, causing the ferry to hit the breakwater. 
According to operating company Naviera Armas, the drop in voltage happened for only two minutes. 
The company insists the power cut would not have caused any problems had the boat been on the open seas or in a safe anchorage. 
A spokesman told el Diario: 'If that voltage drop had occurred inside the bay or on the high seas nothing would have happened. 
'Having the dock next to it was what caused the accident.'
The ferry lost power as it was leaving port and crew attempts to stop the collision by getting the engines restarted and throwing down anchors failed.
The damaged port wall came down on two vehicles belonging to oil firm Onyx which were refuelling a nearby ship, causing an oil spill which last night/on Friday night led to an environmental emergency being declared.
Up to 200,000 litres of fuel was initially feared to have spilled, although port authority sources said they believed the situation could be brought under control without major environmental consequences because of sea currents.
Coastguards vessels were sent to inspect the scene on Friday night.
A police investigation was underway last night in conjunction with a separate investigation by the ferry's owner Naviera Armas.
Footage taken from inside the damaged vessel after the collision - and posted on social media - showed furious passengers arguing with crew who were trying to calm them down.

The incident, involving a car ferry called the Volcan de Tamasite which regularly covers the two-and-a-half-long route between the two islands, happened just before 8.30 on Friday
The incident, involving a car ferry called the Volcan de Tamasite which regularly covers the two-and-a-half-long route between the two islands, happened just before 8.30 on Friday
An Italian man could be overheard yelling about the lack of information while a Spaniard insisted: 'We want to get off' as he told a female crew member surrounded by angry passengers that there were children on board.
The passengers began to leave the ship around 10pm and many were put up in hotels overnight.
Passenger Gabriel Velazquez said afterwards: 'People were very nervous when they felt a loud bang and then things got out of hand because no-one really knew what was happening.'
Another added: 'There were people on the floor. One of the women working in the cafe ended up trapped when something fell on her and had to be helped out.' 
In December 2008, a ferry carrying 172 holidaymakers ran aground off Tenerife.
The Fred Olsen catamaran Bonanza Express got into trouble as it reached the popular tourist port at Los Cristianos in the south of the island.
Up to 200,000 litres of fuel was initially feared to have spilled, although port authority sources said they believed the situation could be brought under control without major environmental consequences because of sea currents
Up to 200,000 litres of fuel was initially feared to have spilled, although port authority sources said they believed the situation could be brought under control without major environmental consequences because of sea currents
The accident happened as the ship brought passengers back from a day trip to the nearby island of La Gomera.
In February 2013 five crew menbers were killed, and another three injured, after a lifeboat fell into the sea from a cruise ship tied up at the port of Santa Cruz de la Palma in the Canary Islands.
The accident happened on the Majesty, operated by UK-based Thomson Cruises, during a routine safety drill.
The bow of the ferry involved in yesterday evening's/Friday evening's accident hit the port wall.
Work to repair the damaged 30-foot wall is expected to last around four months and cost millions of pounds.
The damaged ferry returned to the port after the incident with the help of two salvage tugs although its engines restarted after the spectacular collision.
Footage taken from inside the damaged vessel after the collision - and posted on social media - showed furious passengers arguing with crew who were trying to calm them down
Footage taken from inside the damaged vessel after the collision - and posted on social media - showed furious passengers arguing with crew who were trying to calm them down
Naviera Armas boasts on its website of being the most important shipping company in the Canary Islands.
It was established in 1941 and has used more than 50 vessels over the years.
It operates around half a dozen vessels named after volcanoes in the Canary Islands.
Volcan de Tamasite, the one involved in Friday's accident, can carry 1,500 passengers and 300 vehicles and operates at 23 knots. 
It was put into service 13 years ago. 

Old Pics Of The Port Of Felixstowe From The Late Derek Swan's Collection




 All the above photo's come from Derek Swan's personal collection some of which have never seen the light of day. I have been given permission to copy and post these pics. R.I.P Swanny






Ports – winners and losers after launch of mega alliances


The new alliances have led to a shake-up of ports, says CargoSmart, which has launched Alliance Reshuffle Dashboard (under Route Master), to keep track

More ports will be dropped than added in the new alliance networks, according to research from CargoSmart.
Six ports will be dropped on Asia-Europe and eight will be added, while on the transpacific 11 will be dropped and six added. On the transatlantic, five alliance ports will be dropped and five added. On the Asia-Europe trade, Hamburg will lose five alliance services, but average vessel size has increased by 600 teu and there will be 13 more vessels calling at its facilities, while Rotterdam will lose three slings, but will see 30 more vessels call at its terminals.
Over in the US, Long Beach will lose four alliance services, but Los Angeles will gain three. Other results include: Charleston will lose eight services and New York and New Jersey will lose four.
There will be fewer services offered through the Suez Canal, moving from 15 per cent to 8 per cent. And among the services through the Panama Canal, more than 50 per cent are operated via Ocean Alliance.
Meanwhile, 50 per cent of routes will change from direct to transhipment routes, according to CargoSmart’s research. It warned in a webinar: “Fewer direct route options and more transshipments could lead to a higher chance of missed schedules.” It gave the example that transpacific trade routes will have decreased after April 2.
While 60 per cent of Asia-Europe routes will have shorter transit times.
CargoSmart has launched Route Master, the first tool that lets shippers visualise, compare, and respond faster to ocean carriers’ and alliances’ service changes. The company has also launched a new pop-up tool, the Alliance Reshuffle Dashboard, to track the shipping alliances’ vessel deployments to their new services, under the brand of Route Master.