Felixstowe Dockers

Felixstowe Dockers

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

COSCO Shipping returns to black



Shanghai-listed COSCO Shipping posted profits of CNY191.7M ($31.29M) for the first three quarters this year. Photo: PA
Shanghai-listed COSCO Shipping posted profits of CNY191.7M ($31.29M) for the first three quarters this year, returning to black from the loss of CNY42.8M in the same period last year, according to its fiscal report yesterday.
The company recorded revenue of CNY547.3M, down by 3.24% year on year, and its earnings per share (EPS) went up by 548% to CNY0.113.
It received CNY182.9M in subsidies for ship scrapping from its parent company COSCO group on September 30.


COSCO Shipping attributed the profit to the enhancement of marketing, the improvement of its fleet as well as strict control of operation cost.
During the first nine months, the company's fleet handled a total 10.4M tonnes of cargo, down by 6% than the previous year. Its multipurpose vessels (MPV) shipped 3.6M tonnes of cargos during this period, down by 26.2% y/y and accounting for 34.6% of total cargo.
As bunker prices keep dropping, COSCO Shipping is projected to reduce more operational cost and perform better this year, according to analysis by Guangfa Securities.

Aboard Edith Maersk – and meeting her Captain October 21, 2014





While she was alongside at London Gateway, we took the opportunity to go aboard Edith Maersk, and to meet her master, Captain Regin Hansen.


Shipping TV

Driver shortage crisis spreads to the air freight sector, choking UK supply chains

24/10/13 A14 crash involving motorcyclist


The driver shortage crisis hitting UK supply chains appears to have entered a new phase, with forwarders reporting that it now appears to be hitting the air freight sector.
The British International Freight Association (Bifa) said its members had experienced difficulties “caused by the shortage of HGV drivers being compounded by an earlier-then-expected peak season, with higher-than-forecast volumes of container and trailer imports”.
And the problem has spread beyond the container haulage sector into general trucking and beyond.
One source told The Loadstar: “The impact on drivers and haulage is affecting air freight big-time at London Heathrow and Manchester, with the traditional hauliers struggling to cover workloads, or charging through the nose.”
“Domestic haulage is pretty screwed also, in general – so it’s not just ocean freight containers,” he added.
“If using merchant or approved/preferred hauliers, there is an improvement, but all suppliers, whether through line or direct, want longer lead times and are not interested in new business currently.”
He added that despite a series of haulage surcharges introduced by shipping lines, “shipping line-arranged haulage is still very, very poor”.
OOCL and MOL were the first to introduce either booking restrictions or an inland haulage surcharge, and have been joined in recent days by China Shipping’s £70 surcharge out of Southampton, and APL, which set its surcharge at £75 per container.

Maersk currently requires five working days’ notice for a vehicle booking, while CMA CGM and Evergreen want seven.
Privately, forwarders feel aggrieved at the extra charge, complaining that carriers do not appear to be using the funds to try and solve the problem.
Separately, BIFA director general Robert Keen also reiterated warnings that the shortage of drivers could lead to serious delivery delays in the run-up to Christmas,
“Our members report significantly increased waiting times for an available vehicle, much higher costs from haulage companies and surcharges from some shipping lines.
“New HGV drivers are urgently required in the UK logistics business to help alleviate the problems caused by the current shortage, which is leading to significant pressures on logistics costs.
“BIFA has noted that the growing problem of UK HGV driver shortages has been taken up by an MP, former haulier Andrew Bridgen, and shares his opinion that there needs to be some sort of incentivisation to encourage more individuals to train to become HGV drivers.
“This issue is similar to the recent passport crisis: not how many have been processed, what the shortfall is and what can be done to alleviate that shortfall,” he said.


Tuesday, 21 October 2014

OPDR EXTENDS SERVICE AT TILBURY'S LONDON CONTAINER TERMINAL


London Container Terminal in Tilbury announces today (20th October) an extension to their agreement with short-sea shipping and logistics specialists Oldenburg-Portugiesische Dampfschiffs-Rhederei (OPDR), which sees OPDR’s new liner service from Agadir, Morocco calling at the Port of Tilbury for five transit days.
London Container Terminal (LCT) currently handles over 200 calls per annum for OPDR services on their routes between the Iberian Peninsula including the Canary Islands, North Africa and the UK, as announced in November 2013. OPDR’s newly established subsidiary, ‘OPDR Maroc’, headquartered in Casablanca, has opened an office in Agadir to support the newly launched service connection by OPDR from Agadir to the North Continent.
OPDR’s ‘Argan Express’ service offers short transit times to South and Northern Europe. OPDR will employ three 700 TEU vessels which provide space for up to 120 reefer containers on this weekly service.


Commenting on the announcement, Perry Glading, Chief Operating Officer of Forth Ports (owners of London Container Terminal) said: “We are thrilled to be growing our relationship with OPDR, whom we have worked with over the past year, with this additional call from Agadir, Morocco. LCT has the perfect shipping location for OPDR’s services, with a sophisticated supply chain infrastructure and fast and reliable connections. We have the experience, expertise and equipment to deliver a first rate service and we continue to invest significantly in LCT, as we work to integrate container handling across both the deep sea and short sea operations, further securing Tilbury as a key shipping and distribution location with unrivalled access to London and the South East of England.”
“The new express service is especially designed for perishable cargo – such as tomatoes and citrus fruits – from Agadir to the UK market”, says Till Ole Barrelet, Chief Executive Officer of the OPDR Group. “We are happy to have LCT as a partner with fast connections to the metropolitan area of London and beyond.”

LCT handles in excess of half a million containers per year, and is the only UK port truly servicing both deep sea and short sea customers.

IMO Ebola Infographic: What You Need to Know On Board Ships and In Ports


The chances of attracting the Ebola Virus Disease while onboard your ship or in port is extremely low, even if you find yourself traveling to and from the hardest hit countries in West Africa. For those of you onboard ships that don’t call in those countries, namely Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, your chances of coming down with the deadly disease are practically zero, and still only slightly higher if you find yourself onboard a Carnival cruise ship.
None-the-less, the International Maritime Oganization, through its work the World Health Organization and the ad hoc Ebola Travel and Transport Task Force, has issued some tips on what to do on board ships and in ports of Ebola-affected counties. While the infographic is specific to Ebola, it actually offers some good tips about fighting shipboard viruses in general, especially considering cold and flu season is right around the corner. After all, your fear of Ebola shouldn’t be the only reason to wash your hands.
Click the infographic above to enlarge and for additional IMO resources regarding Ebola, see HERE.


Dealing with Charterparty Issues in Ebola-Affected Ports



DUE TO THE FACT THAT STANDARD CHARTERPARTIES DO NOT CONTAIN CLAUSES SPECIFICALLY DRAFTED TO DEAL WITH EBOLA-AFFECTED PORTS, FEVER AND EPIDEMIC CLAUSES CAN BE DRAFTED. HOWEVER, WHERE THEY ARE ABSENT FROM A CHARTERPARTY THERE ARE A NUMBER OF ISSUES THAT CAN ARISE, ACCORDING TO UK THINK-TANK GRAY PAGE.


 The general rule is that the Master is obliged to follow charterers’ orders – and a charterer is to pay hire continuously through the charter period.  Whilst the Safe Port warranty generally relates to the safety of the vessel and cargo, an unacceptable risk to crew may render the port unsafe.  Nevertheless, the presence locally of Ebola may not render a port unsafe per se, particularly if there is to be no direct physical contact between the crew and persons at the port,” the think tank explained.
As a result,  charterers’ primary obligation is to nominate a port which is prospectively safe.  If the port becomes unsafe after nomination, owners and charterers may wish to check whether the charterparty has a Liberty clause which may be invoked.
Speaking of potential delays  at both Ebola-affected ports and for vessels arriving at other ports after calling at Ebola-affected ports, the think-tank said that there is a risk that a vessel could be placed off hire if it is quarantined prior to being allowed entry to a port.
“Therefore, Quarantine and Free Pratique clauses should be examined as they may affect both the commencement of Laytime and the giving of Notices of Readiness.”
Contingency Planning
As stressed by Gray Page, it is essential for any owner, operator or manager with vessels trading to ports in Ebola-affected countries (or even passing by them), to have a plan of action for certain contingencies:
  • A crew member presents with symptoms indicative of Ebola while at sea after a port call in an Ebola-affected country – or while alongside in an Ebola-affected country.
  • A supernumerary presents with symptoms indicative of Ebola while at sea after a port call in an Ebola-affected country – or while alongside in an Ebola-affected country.
  • A vessel needs to deviate to a port in an Ebola-affected country in emergency circumstances (Port of Refuge, major medical incident not Ebola-related).
  • A vessel is quarantined at a port following a previous call at port in an Ebola-affected country because one or more crew suspected of having contracted Ebola.
Plans should identify the roles, and delineate the responsibilities of, those responding to any such eventualities, as well as establishing:
  • Points of contact for relevant national/local authorities (health, port, diplomatic, law enforcement)
  • Identification of correspondents, enablers and subject matter experts (locally and internationally)
  • Priorities for allocating resources and applying them
Gray Page forecasts that the shipping industry should expect Ebola outbreak in West Africa to be having an impact on operations deep into 2015.
Fortunately, the risks to crews of contracting Ebola are extremely small if common sense precautions are taken. Unfortunately, contractual disputes between owners, charterers, shippers and receivers are an almost inevitable consequence of the growing restrictions on ships trading to and from ports in Ebola-affected countries,” the organization concluded.

West Africa Ebola Outbreak 
Guidance to UK Ports & Shipping OperatorsVersion 1 - October 2014 
Purpose of Document 
This document offers general guidance for minimising the risk to seafarers, port workers, passengers and others in the maritime environment, from the current outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. 
Instructions from company medical advisors, port medical officers or public health authorities should always take primacy over the advice in this document. If you have any concerns, please contact your manager. 
General Background 
There is currently an outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) occurring in West Africa. This is already the largest known outbreak of this disease worldwide. The current list of Affected Countries can be found below. 
Ebola is a rare but serious viral infection, spread person to person by direct contact with blood and body fluids of infected people. It does not transmit through the air. The incubation period is 2-21 days and there is negligible risk of transmission during the incubation period (i.e. before symptoms appear). Ebola virus is easily killed by soap or bleach and survives only a short time on dry surfaces or those exposed to sunlight. 
Ebola virus is not spread through routine, social contact (such as shaking hands) with asymptomatic individuals. The likelihood of contracting any viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Ebola, is considered very low unless there has been a specific exposure. Ebola transmission has commonly been between family members with close contact to infected individuals and health care workers with extremely close contact to patients or body fluids. Infection occurs from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, or other body fluids (such as stool, urine, saliva, semen) of infected people. 
As with other infectious diseases, one of the most important preventive measures is frequent hand-washing with soap and water, or use alcohol-based hand rubs containing at least 60 percent alcohol when soap and water aren't available. However, it is important to remember that if hands are visibly soiled, then alcohol hand rubs are not sufficient and washing with soap and water is needed. 
When travelling abroad, it is important to take sensible precautions against the many more common health risks prevalent in the region, such as malaria, HIV and Hepatitis B. 
Further information can be found at: 
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ebola-virus/pages/ebola-virus.aspx 
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ebola-virus-disease-clinical- management-and-guidance 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-ship-captains-medical-guide(see Chapter 5, causes and prevention of disease) 
Affected Countries (at time of issue) 
The following states have established transmission of the Ebola virus: Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia 
The following states have cases but no established transmission outside of the cluster of cases linked to a single imported case: 
Nigeria (Lagos and Port Harcourt), Senegal (Dakar), Spain (Madrid), USA (Dallas, TX.) 
Refer to the WHO website for further updates on the geographic extent of the outbreak: 
http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/en/ 
Additional Sources of Information 
It is advisable to check FCO and local guidance and advice on avoiding infection during the current outbreak: 
https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice 
Currently the World Health Organization (WHO) advises states with Ebola transmission should conduct exit screening of all persons at international airports, seaports and major land crossings, for unexplained febrile illness consistent with potential Ebola infection. The exit screening should consist of, at a minimum, a questionnaire, a temperature measurement and, if there is a fever, an assessment of the risk that the fever is caused by EVD. 
It is therefore recommended that the existing WHO procedures contained in their “Guidance for ships and shipping companies” should be followed. 
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Copies of the Guidance can be found in circular letters (Nos. 3484 & 3485) issued by the IMO, which are available through the IMO website (www.imo.org). These provide information and guidance, based on recommendations developed by WHO, on the precautions to be taken to minimize risks to seafarers, passengers and others in the maritime environment from the Ebola virus disease: 
http://www.imo.org/Documents/3484.pdf http://www.imo.org/MediaCentre/HotTopics/ebola/Documents/3485.pdf 
On-line Information 
Further information on dealing with the consequences of the outbreak, specifically aimed at the maritime industry, can be found on the following links: 
  •   The UK Chamber of Shipping have set up an information page about Ebola on their website:-http://www.ukchamberofshipping.com/news/2014/10/08/ebola-information/ 
  •   The ICS (International Chamber of Shipping), IMEC (International Maritime Employers’ Council), and the ITF (International Transport Workers’ Federation) have issued a joint note on Ebola :- http://www.ics- shipping.org/docs/default-source/Other-documents/urgent-communication-on- the-risk-of-the-ebola-virus.pdf?sfvrsn=4 
  •   UK P&I Club have issued a practical guidance note for seafarers on Ebola, as well as other advice on contractual and ports issues:-http://www.ukpandi.com/fileadmin/uploads/uk- pi/LP%20Documents/UK_P_I_Club_Briefing_-_Ebola_Outbreak.pdf 
  •   The Swedish P&I Club have issued advice on Ebola for shippers, including dealing with stowaways:-http://www.safety4sea.com/swedish-club-issues- notice-re-ebola-virus-and-stowaways-21750 
  •   The WHO also have an updated Travel and Transport section, which is very helpful, especially the section 3.3 “Recommendations for ships” which provides guidance on managing suspected Ebola cases on board
    ships:- 
    http://www.who.int/ith/updates/20140421/en/ 
    If you think you may have been exposed to the Ebola virus: 
    If you think you have been exposed or if you develop symptoms consistent with Ebola (see links above), within 21 days of an exposure, call the NHS 111 helpline (if in the UK) or, if overseas, follow your company arrangements for seeking medical advice. 
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Edith Maersk - largest ship to sail up the Thames




On Sunday, 19th October 2014, the Edith Maersk, a 15,500 TEU E-Class Maersk Line container ship has become the largest ever vessel to sail up the River Thames, docking at the new port of DP World London Gateway to load around 1,000 empty containers due to be returned to the Far East.
The film includes an interview with London Gateway Harbourmaster Colin Hitchcock, and will be follow by a second report including an interview with the ship’s master, and coverage of London Gateway’s progress during its first year in business.



Thames Makes Room for Largest Ship Ever
The largest ship ever to enter the Thames arrived at DP World London Gateway on 19th October 2014 in the early hours of the morning.
The 397-metre-long, 56-metre-wide Edith Maersk has a draught of 16 metres and can carry up to 15,500 standard containers.
Edith Maersk was built by the Odense Steel Shipyard, Denmark and was handed over to the A.P. Moller – Maersk Group on Saturday 3 November 2007.


Edith Maersk and her sister ship Emma Maersk are one of the world’s largest cargo ships.
World Maritime News Staff; Image: Maersk

The biggest ship ever to navigate the Thames: Giant cargo vessel leaves British waters bound for Singapore... operated by a crew of just 13

  • The ship was built in Denmark and completed in late 2007; it can carry 13,500 20ft and 40ft containers
  • Edith Maersk serviced in number two berth at London Gateway by five of the port's cranes - the largest in the country
  • The vessel can achieve a top speed of 26 knots (30mph) and fully loaded weighs almost 200,000 tons
The biggest ship to sail up the Thames has left the London Gateway port in Essex and is sailing for its next destination Singapore via the Suez Canal at a steady speed of 23 knots.
The huge cargo ship docked at London Gateway before sunrise yesterday morning, guided in by three Port of London Authority tugs.
Edith Maersk was serviced in number two berth by five of the port's cranes - the largest in the country.
Scroll down for video  
Edith Maersk, the second largest container ship in the world, leaves the Thames Estuary near Canvey Island, Essex. The ship, the largest ever to enter the River Thames, had previously docked at London Gateway after arriving from the Far East
Edith Maersk, the second largest container ship in the world, leaves the Thames Estuary near Canvey Island, Essex. The ship, the largest ever to enter the River Thames, had previously docked at London Gateway after arriving from the Far East
Edith Maersk dwarfs London's biggest buildings, at almost 200ft longer than the Shard is tall. It is more than 400ft longer than the Titanic, and more than four times the length of the Cutty Sark
Edith Maersk dwarfs London's biggest buildings, at almost 200ft longer than the Shard is tall. It is more than 400ft longer than the Titanic, and more than four times the length of the Cutty Sark
Thanks to London Gateway, gargantuan E-class ships can  be accommodated at three ports in England - Felixstowe and Southampton being the others.
The vessel, the second largest container ship in the world, was launched in 2007 and can navigate the Thames following the opening of London Gateway port in the Thames Estuary.
The Gateway cost £1.5bn to build and was opened last year.  It is located on the former 1,500-acre Shell Haven site, which closed in 1999. 
Edith Mærsk is more than 50 per cent longer than Titanic and four times the length of a football pitch.
Spending just a day at Thames Gateway, Edith Maersk is bound for the Suez Canal en route to Singapore, a journey expected to take about a month
Spending just a day at Thames Gateway, Edith Maersk is bound for the Suez Canal en route to Singapore, a journey expected to take about a month

THE EDITH MAERSK IN FACTS AND FIGURES 

Tonnage: 172,960 tons (deadweight tonnage)/188, 268 (gross tons)            Length 430 yds/397m (1,302.49 ft) 
Beam: 56m (183.73 ft)                                                                                    Draught: 30m (98.43 ft) 
Draft: 17.5 m (57 ft)                                                                                        Speed: 26 knots (30mph) (maximum)/25.2 knots (29mph) (cruising)
Capacity:13,500 20ft containers                                                                     Crew: 13
Propulsion: Wärtsilä engine 80,000 kW 
Edith Maersk was escorted away from London Gateway in Essex by tugs from the Port of London Authority into the open sea
Edith Maersk was escorted away from London Gateway in Essex by tugs from the Port of London Authority into the open sea
Fully loaded, Edith Maersk weighs almost 200,000 tons and can carry 13,500 containers measuring 20ft and 40ft 
Fully loaded, Edith Maersk weighs almost 200,000 tons and can carry 13,500 containers measuring 20ft and 40ft 
Bon voyage: Edith Maersk sets sail tonight from London Gateway. It was the biggest ship to have navigated the waters of the Thames 
Bon voyage: Edith Maersk sets sail tonight from London Gateway. It was the biggest ship to have navigated the waters of the Thames 
The graphic demonstrates the sheer length of the Edith Maersk - it is even longer than the Shard, the highest building in the EU
The graphic demonstrates the sheer length of the Edith Maersk - it is even longer than the Shard, the highest building in the EU


Monday, 20 October 2014

Ports / Docks are dangerous places to work whatever your job tiltle might be


To all you employers out there thinking about out sourcing / having casual labour within your Port. This is what skilled Dockers deal with every day somewhere in the world.


Zero hours contracts do not clean this lot up.



We all believe that it will never happen to 
us!!!!! this is dock work, it does and it will happen.


The majority of Dockers around the world are paid a good wage, the above pictures are one of the many factors for that good wage to be paid.



There is a reason, why we are proffesionals, there is a reason why we don't get killed every day... The reason is we KNOW what we are dealing with here...
So EU Troika and employers WHO think selfservicing and casual untrained Labour is the way forward, forget it.
WE WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO KILL LABOUR, AND WE WILL NOT LET YOU KILL OUR JOBS, NEVER SURRENDER !